One of the problems I am confronted with when I do digital paintings is to be able to see them all at once. Because I do not print all of my paintings, I can’t spread them in front of me or put them on walls to seize the overall impact of my work as it is possible to do with paintings on canvas for example.

My digital hybrid painting "À même le roc" (On the Rock) in a simulated display created with PhotoFunia app. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

My digital hybrid painting “À même le roc” (On the Rock) in a simulated display created with PhotoFunia app.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

The Compromise

For now, the only way I could find to see all my paintings is to create a digital image gallery to watch on the computer. It is not an ideal solution because that way, the paintings are very small (much more than their possible print size), and I must look at them one after the other. So it is a real challenge to imagine the impact which would have a solo exhibition of my digital paintings.

Simulated photo showing my digital hybrid painting: À même le roc" (On the Rock). Created with PhotoFunia. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Simulated photo showing my digital hybrid painting: À même le roc” (On the Rock).
Created with PhotoFunia.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Printed Digital Paintings

Another challenge is to be capable of imagining the given effect when the paintings would be printed.

  • Different size. The printing size rarely corresponds to that of the screen of the computer on which the artwork was created.
  • Added texture. The surface on which is printed the digital painting often adds texture to the artwork (think of canvas for example). It is not always a good thing.
  • Reduced luminosity. A large part of the luminosity coming from the screen and giving life to digital painting is lost when the artwork is printed. I’m sure that you have already noticed to what extent a photo seen on the screen of a computer or on the television is bright compared to the same which has been printed on regular photo paper. The same thing applies to digital paintings printed on traditional photo paper, fine art paper or canvas.
The simulated display of my digital hybrid painting "À même le roc", in big size on a gallery wall. Simulation created with PhotoFunia app. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

The simulated display of my digital hybrid painting “À même le roc”, in big size on a gallery wall. Simulation created with PhotoFunia app.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Ideally

Of course, the ideal would be to enjoy digital paintings on the bright screen of a computer, a tablet, a TV or with one of these giant digital photo frames at $ 500 instead of printing them.

Imagine the walls of an art gallery lined with a series of luminous screens showing digital paintings, or a giant digital picture frame in your living room to admire artworks created to be at their best on such display…

However, in reality, few people are going to buy tools to display digital paintings. So what’s left as a choice? …. Printing.

Simulated image showing my art on a magazine cover. Created with PhotoFunia. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Simulated image showing my art on a magazine cover.
Created with PhotoFunia.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

For Now

For now, I find that the professional inkjet printing on acid-free fine art paper with a light texture gives the best effect. However, I keep my eyes open to other possibilities because I would like to print my digital paintings in a larger format while avoiding cumbersome and fragile under-glass framing and avoiding too much pixelation. I already have some ideas, but if you have any suggestions, I’m all ears!

A last image simulated, created with the PhotoFunia app. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

A last image simulated, created with the PhotoFunia app.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

PhotoFunia App

While waiting to find the best way to print my digital paintings in a larger format or a place to display them on a luminous screen, I had fun with the free PhotoFunia application for Windows (also available for iOS, Android, BlackBerry, Firefox and others) and use it to illustrate this blog post.

The app makes it possible to display digital photo in various locations. It’s fast an easy. I especially like to be able, in a few clicks, to insert my digital paintings in prestigious art galleries’s settings.

Size and Location

Looking at the pictures on the blog post, you will quickly find that not only the size of the artwork, but also the place it is located, changes the way we perceive it. The discrete small picture frame at home, the big frame hanged to the wall of the art gallery or the one on an outside wall … Enough to feed my thoughts and research.

In closing, here is the digital hybrid painting “À meme le roc” (On the rock) in a larger size…

"À même le roc" (On the Rock) Digital hybrid painting created digitally with scanned mixed media paintings and digital texture and effects. July 2015. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

“À même le roc” (On the Rock)
Digital hybrid painting created digitally with scanned mixed media paintings and digital texture and effects.
July 2015.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Closeup from the digital hybrid painting "À même le roc" (On the Rock). July 2015. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Closeup from the digital hybrid painting “À même le roc” (On the Rock).
July 2015.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Another closeup from the digital hybrid painting "À même le roc" (On the Rock). July 2015. © 2015, Louise Lamirande.

Another closeup from the digital hybrid painting “À même le roc” (On the Rock).
July 2015.
© 2015, Louise Lamirande.

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