Following are new experimental paintings inspired by the book “Acrylic Painting for Encaustic Effects” written by Sandra Duran Wilson. This time, I tried a technique using a translucent matte polyester film from Dura-Lar and faux encaustic acrylic medium on a painted background.

Translucent and Matte Dura-Lar

This paper is actually an acid-free polyester translucent film with a matte finish (Dura-Lar company also makes a transparent polyester film, but it is not the one  used for this technique). The translucent Dura-Lar can be painted (or not) on one face or both. It is also possible to draw on it and even to print on it with your inkjet or laser printer. To learn more about Dura-Lar products, visit this website: Grafix.

A first glimpse of my two experimental paintings…

First glimpse on faux encaustic effect created with translucent Dura-Lar and acrylic paint and medium. February 2016. © 2016, Louise Lamirande.

First glimpse on faux encaustic effect created with translucent Dura-Lar and acrylic paint and medium.
February 2016.
© 2016, Louise Lamirande.

The Process

Here is how I proceeded to create these paintings:

I started with two layers of acrylic ink (transparent red and blue – High Flow from Golden) on the two pages of my experimental art journal.

View of the left page. The black line shows where the translucent rectangle of Dura-Lar had been glued. February 2016. © 2016, Louise Lamirande.

View of the left page. The black line shows where the translucent rectangle of Dura-Lar had been glued.
February 2016.
© 2016, Louise Lamirande.

View of the right page. One or two layers of Dura-Lar are glued on it to mimic encaustic. Read the blog post for details. February 2016. © 2016, Louise Lamirande.

View of the right page. One or two layers of Dura-Lar are glued on it to mimic encaustic. Read the blog post for details.
February 2016.
© 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Detail of the Right Page

Then I placed a rectangle of unpainted translucent matte Dura-Lar on the top half of the right page, followed by another rectangle of Dura-Lar on the bottom half of the same page. In this case, the Dura-Lar was previously painted with red and gold acrylic paint (Liquitex) and glued, colored face down.

Closeup from the right page. There is one layer of unpainted Dura-Lar on the top pinky part of the page. The blue part shows two layers of Dura-Lar, one unpainted, the other painted with blue and gold, face down. February 2016. © 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Closeup from the right page. There is one layer of unpainted Dura-Lar on the top pinky part of the page. The blue part shows two layers of Dura-Lar, one unpainted, the other painted with blue and gold.
February 2016.
© 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Then, still on the right page, I glued another rectangle of translucent Dura-Lar over the junction between the two previous rectangles, covering them partially. The third parts was painted before being glued with red and gold paint face down and blue face up.

Bottom of the right page. The upper blue part has two layers of painted translucent Dura-Lar. The bottom part has one. February 2016. © 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Bottom of the right page. The upper blue part has two layers of painted translucent Dura-Lar. The bottom part has one.
February 2016.
© 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Photos allow you to see the various effects of translucency with one or two layers of Dura-Lar and the difference when it is painted or not.

The black line was added after the paint was dried, before applying the faux encaustic acrylic medium to accentuate the different areas and also to hide the borders of the Dura-Lar.

Detail of the Left Page

To the left page, I proceeded more simply. I glued a rectangle of translucent Dura-Lar painted with red and gold side up. The area is clearly delimited by a black line made with a permanent marker.

Closeup from the left page. The rectangle shows the painted translucent rectangle of Dura-Lar glued face up. February 2016. © 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Closeup from the left page. The rectangle shows the painted translucent rectangle of Dura-Lar glued face up.
February 2016.
© 2016, Louise Lamirande.

I applied three layers of my new faux encaustic medium recipe over the two experimental paintings (see photo below):

50% gel (matte) from Liquitex & 50% glossy high solid gel (glossy) from Golden. It is more efficient than my previous recipe, but it is to be perfected

Closeup view of the texture with two layers of faux encaustic medium. February 2016. © 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Closeup view of the texture with two layers of faux encaustic medium.
February 2016.
© 2016, Louise Lamirande.

Plus and cons of this technique

Using the translucent matte Dura-Lar to mimic encaustic is one of the most effective techniques I’ve tried so far.

  • The translucent veil effect is instantaneous.
  • The translucent Dura-Lar creates a sense of depth more efficiently than several layers of acrylic medium.
  • Painting one or both sides of the Dura-Lar before glueing it increases the creative possibilities.
  • However, in terms of thickness, multiple layers of acrylic medium are still needed to complete the effect of encaustic.
  • The thick Dura-Lar film could not be glued on a heavy textured surface; it is too thick. The substrate or painted surfaces must be flat.

This technique to mimic encaustic with Dura-Lar pleasantly stimulates my creativity and finally gives me the feeling, after several weeks performing tests, to be on an interesting track to deepen.

Thanks for your visit and see you soon,

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