Today, I show you to the remains of my acrylic and oil painting experiments. If you missed the previous blog post, just click here to read it .

In this new series of experimental paintings, I wanted first of all:

  • To work in a slightly larger size (8 x 10 inches / 20.3 x 25.4 cm),
  • To try new collage elements and…
  • To deeper explore the idea of extending the texture beyond the wood panels.

As for the previous painting series, I began by sealing the wood panels with several layers of acrylic medium (GAC 100 Golden).

Prepartion: Sealing the wood panels with a few layers of acrylic medium (GAC 100 from Golden). December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Prepartion: Sealing the wood panels with a few layers of acrylic medium (GAC 100 from Golden).
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Then, I search for material to use as texture. I finally chose:

  • Cheesecloth
  • Burlap (recycled from a basmati rice bag)
  • Crepe paper (the one used as decorative streamers for parties)
  • Canson sketch paper (also recycled from a previous project)
  • Buckwheat scales (it’s crazy all I have accumulated over time, just waiting to be used for a collage!)
Looking for collage elements to create texture effects. December 2017. © 201, Louise Lamirande.

Looking for collage elements to create texture effects.
December 2017.
© 201, Louise Lamirande.

The elements were then glued with acrylic medium (Liquitex mat gel).

The elements are glued with the acrylic gel medium. December 2017. © 201, Louise Lamirande.

The elements are glued with the acrylic gel medium.
December 2017.
© 201, Louise Lamirande.

Freshly glued texture elements: cheesecloth, crepe paper and buckwheat scales. December 2017. © 201, Louise Lamirande.

Freshly glued texture elements: cheesecloth, crepe paper and buckwheat scales.
December 2017.
© 201, Louise Lamirande.

Freshly glued texture elements: cheesecloth, crepe paper, Canson paper and burlap . December 2017. © 201, Louise Lamirande.

Freshly glued texture elements: cheesecloth, crepe paper, Canson paper and burlap .
December 2017.
© 201, Louise Lamirande.

To facilitate the adhesion of the oil paint and to neutralize the colors of the various textures, I then covered everything with black gesso (Holbein).

After the layer of black gesso. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

After the layer of black gesso.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Closeup showing the texture covered with the black geso. December 2017. © 201, Louise Lamirande.

Closeup showing the texture covered with the black geso.
December 2017.
© 201, Louise Lamirande.

Side view of the texture. You may see the relief and what exceeds the wooden support. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Side view of the texture. You may see the relief and what exceeds the wooden support.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

After that, I began to use oil paint. I like to paint the underlayers with very colors creating a nice contrast with the top layers. So I started with these strange shades of yellow, orange, peach and pink.

First layers of oil paint using accent colors. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

First layers of oil paint using accent colors.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Then, I added other colors more in line with what I was looking for.

View from the result after more oil paint layers. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

View from the result after more oil paint layers.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Another closeup. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Another closeup.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Another one. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

Another one.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

From de side. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

From de side.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

This texture exceeding the wood panel is interesting, but a potential source of problems. December 2017. © 2017, Louise Lamirande.

This texture exceeding the wood panel is interesting, but a potential source of problems.
December 2017.
© 2017, Louise Lamirande.

The result does not please me, I admit it, but since it is about experimenting and trying something new and out of my comfort zone, it is not really important. What matters is that I have explored an idea and come out with both positive and negative conclusions.

  • This technique seems to have a lot of potential for figurative, semi-figurative as well as abstract paintings.
  • The choice of materials to glue as texture is very wide. However, I wonder what would be the impact on a very large painting and what materials would be the most interesting to glue.
  • The texture extruding from the wood boards offers some visual interest, but raises a bunch of problems.
  • Fragility (especially with oil painting on top)
  • Potential framing problems
  • Problematic storage since artworks cannot stand upright without risk of damaging the extruding parts.
  • But what worries me most is what I read on Golden Paints website. In short, it says that the acrylic paint will shrink and expand over time in response to environmental conditions in a different way to the layers of oil paint, which could lead to serious cracking problems, especially if acrylic underlayers are thick and heavily textures or if the embedded other materials. Even taking into account Golden Paints recommendations, it is risky.

That’s why I decided to stop these experiments for now. I could decide to pursue them by using only acrylic paint and mediums, but that’s not what I want. At this moment at least…

So, why did I share all this with you? To show you that all the creative paths we follow do not turn out as we are expecting and that it is completely normal. That’s part of the risks we take in exploring new paths. We then have the choice to look for solutions to overcome the difficulties or to give up as I chose to do this time. I am still convinced that these experiments were worth it. Who knows if the lessons learned will not help me in another project? At least, it has allowed me to warn you. It’s good, no?

Thanks for your presence and see you soon,

Related Posts

Pin It on Pinterest